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Justin Hall's personal site growing & breaking down since 1994

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Celebrating New Year's Eve in Tokyo

Japanese people tend to celebrate New Year's Eve quietly with friends and family. That leaves a few large public gatherings. This short video explores four activities in Tokyo on New Year's Eve: visiting the Meiji shrine (before the crowds), parading as a fox to the Oji Inari Shrine, visiting Tokyo Disneyland overnight, and joining a probably illegal dance party in the streets of Shibuya.

Celebrating New Year's Eve in Tokyo on YouTube

Facebook: Celebrating New Year's Eve in Tokyo

This latest episode of the Justin Hall Show employs conventions of Japanese television to celebrate New Year's Eve in Tokyo. Japanese television often features ワイプ - waipu - picture in picture of people's faces, reacting the content on screen. Sort of like a facial laugh track. Here's a picture-in-picture that inspired me during this production:

I attempted using waipu in two places, both where I refer to myself, breaking the new year's narrative. I don't think I do enough with my friends' fun faces in this video; I certainly didn't make anything as madcap as the giraffe situation above.

You may also notice that much Japanese television is not afraid of text. Loads of text onscreen, with glowing, outlined letters. This helped me further unleash fonts, building on the AJ+ inspired video experiment from last month: pee shy. Film forecast says more text in videos to come.

Annotating video feels important in 2016, especially for bringing along mobile viewers. Attempting both Japanese and English subtitles slowed me down but helped me practice my Japanese language skills. Having to transcribe the story lengthens the production time, but forces me to continuously re-evaluate what is worth communicating.

Credits

🎵 Viva La Fiesta by The Mugris
🎵 Quentin by Strong Suit
🎵 In the Fallout Shelter on Typewriters Dreaming Bounding Toward the Snowy Horizon by The Fucked Up Beat
🎵 The Fish by The Fish Who Saved the Planet

🎨 mount Fuji under the moon by artnaturefootage
🎨 Mt_fuji(R469_Yuno)
🎨 Chinese Zodiac Wheel: 20100720_Fukuoka_Kushida_3614_M by Jakub Hałun
🎨 Tokyo-Misty City by darwinfish105
🎨 Carousel from Kawaii Monster Cafe
🎨 渋谷駅前のスクランブル交差点(微速度撮影) - Shibuya Crossing Timelapse by Masahiro Hayata

ワイプタレント: Lauren Gucik, Booth Haley
ありがおう: Ilyse Magy

the Justin Hall Show
thejustinhallshow.com

Released under a Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License

this site's aging continues

22 years ago TODAY the first people outside of my college logged in to check out this web site. So, happy birthday, of sorts, to this inanimate object! I'm glad I'm still able to tweak and poke and expand what's on offer here. Thanks for stopping by!

pee shy

When I was a younger man I had trouble urinating in men's restrooms - my mind got busy preventing me from pissing. I made a video explaining that experience; maybe someone wrestling with the same issue can feel less alone.

YouTube: "pee shy"

Facebook: pee shy

pee shy

When I was a younger man I had trouble urinating in men's restrooms - my mind got busy preventing me from pissing. I made a video explaining that experience; maybe someone wrestling with the same issue can feel less alone.This is an episode of the Justin Hall Show - you can learn more about the episode at this Links.net update: http://links.net/daze/15/12/21-pee-shy.htmlor you can learn more about the Justin Hall Show at http://justinhallshow.com/ and finally you can support future episodes like this or even better and more exciting at http://patreon.com/justin

Posted by Justin's Links on Monday, December 21, 2015

Spoiler: now I can pee pretty easily. Aging, confidence, the experience of having peed successfully before - all combine to have me feeling less anxious and more relieved about a lineup of urinals. Maybe some day I'll feel anxious at a urinal again!

Note: this is a text-heavy moving image. "pee shy" is my attempt to mimic & learn a 2015 video style I've seen exemplified by AJ+ - Al Jazeera's online news wing. I noticed that AJ+ consistently transcribed the words spoken by the subjects of their videos appearing more and more frequently in my Facebook stream, where the videos play without sound by default. I rewatched some of my recent videos with the sound off, and I didn't see enough of the story.

So here's an experiment in telling the story in text along with my voice. It was fun to put my words on the screen and to give them some movement and life and relationship to other words. I revised this film multiple times with no volume, learning more of the communications potential of playful captioning.

This post is aligned with the portion of Justin's Links wherein I describe my physical instantiation.

Thanksgiving Grace for 2015

Shaken and stirred by recent news of refugees, and visiting family in England for a USA holiday of public gratitude, I did some historical research and wrote up this year's Thanksgiving grace to say before a meal:

we are by birth
luck
and timing
fortunate to be here

around this table
with food and family
not hiding
generally unafraid

we give thanks.

we celebrate this holiday together
two handfuls of Americans abroad

we bring with us
a 394 year old story
of pilgrims and natives
partying in peace!

foreigners and locals
reportedly celebrated
the harvest of 1621 together
with meat, sport
and few shared words

perhaps the pilgrims were toasting
the short lines at Wampanoag passport control
pre-Massachusetts:
where fugitives could disembark,
meet a friendly Samoset and Squanto,
be fed by strangers and be left in peace.

Thanksgiving is then a story of refugees well met -
Perhaps a useful modern parable
Whilst we manage the borders around our current prosperity
As others flee brutal darkness towards our glittering light

Today we dine where the pilgrim's exodus began:
They craved religion free from state control
So they fled the Church of England
They took a 66 day boat voyage
And they landed amidst the Wampanoag:
A tribe already decimated by diseases
newly imported by
Explorers, fugitives and refugees.
War and encroachment followed
with these visitors
until the original nations dissolved.

We here are children
more of the pilgrims than the natives.
we flew back to these shores,
maybe 7 to 10 hours.
we eat of the earth, sky and sea
our people have plenty to share
in our storehouses
and plenty to protect

So what loving Truth lies for us
In the "story of Thanksgiving"?

Perhaps that
It is good and rare
to be alive
With healthy family
And a laden table
And a pause long enough to recognize
what sobering riches
we have here today in our lives.

Who controls the media we see on the streets? Maybe advertisers, and maybe street artists. The graffiti scene is dominated by men, and many advertisers are targeting our insecurities. Not everyone can abide this arrangement.

Rachel Cassandra & Lauren Gucik were eager to see their voices appear on the street. They teamed up together and made street art in San Francisco. After discovering the power in their collaboration, they searched out other communities of women making street art. They found a vibrant female street artist scene active in Latin America, and they've chronicled the artists they met in their new book Women Street Artists of Latin America: Art Without Fear / Grafiteras y Muralistas en América Latina: Arte Sin Miedo.

In this interview, Justin Hall, a friend of Rachel & Lauren, learns from them about street art, respect for public space, and women speaking out with brilliant color in a macho culture.

Facebook: Women Street Artists of Latin America: an interview with Rachel Cassandra & Lauren Gucik

Women Street Artists of Latin America: an interview with Rache...

Who controls the media we see on the streets? Maybe advertisers, and maybe street artists. The graffiti scene is dominated by men, and many advertisers are targeting our insecurities. Not everyone can abide this arrangement.Rachel Cassandra & Lauren Gucik were eager to see their voices appear on the street. They teamed up together and made street art in San Francisco. After discovering the power in their collaboration, they searched out other communities of women making street art. They found a vibrant female street artist scene active in Latin America, and they've chronicled the artists they met in their new book Women Street Artists of Latin America: Art Without Fear / Grafiteras y Muralistas en América Latina: Arte Sin Miedo. http://artesinmiedo.net or http://artwithoutfear.netIn this interview, Justin Hall, a friend of Rachel & Lauren, learns from them about street art, respect for public space, and women speaking out with brilliant color in a macho culture. You can find out more about this project on my web site at http://links.net/daze/15/11/21-women-street-artists-of-latin-america-an-interview-with-rachel-cassandra-lauren-gucik.html

Posted by Justin's Links on Monday, November 30, 2015

YouTube: Women Street Artists of Latin America: an interview with Rachel Cassandra & Lauren Gucik

Disclosure: these two people are close friends of mine & I contributed to their 2012 Kickstarter. I met Lauren and Rachel through my wife Ilyse, they are part of Revel art collective together. I have enjoyed many great life adventures with them since, and both were an intimate part of our wedding celebration. So I know about this project and the people behind it, and I am a backer.

The Justin Hall Show shifts between personal stories, performance and interviews. This is my first interview with two people, plus I shot with two video cameras and two mobile phones for four total angles. Three people, four angles each - there's a lot to play with.

Fortunately it turns out that street artists often have video cameras or timelapse filming during creation, and the web gave me reach to follow their Central and South American art trails through Vimeo or Facebook or Instagram or Flickr. So I had good visual source material to put behind our discussion about women and street art.

Featured artists in this video include: Perversa (Bogota, Columbia), Ariz (Guatemala City), and La Kyd & Ladies Destroying Crew (Managua, Nicaragua).

You can learn more and order a copy of the book at artesinmiedo.net or artwithoutfear.net. I would include a link to order the book from Amazon.com but Lauren and Rachel tell me make a good bit more money if you order it directly from them.

I enjoy street art but graffiti tags make me sad, most especially when people tag murals. Talking to these two deepened my understanding of the visual space of cities; I hope you find something worthwhile in what my two friends have made.

Thanks to my supporters on Patreon who fund the Justin Hall Show.

how about 150 years of guaranteed privacy

How about if I post a story here with names & specifics covered up for privacy's sake. There's a 150 year timer, after which time they are revealed. Hah!